Much of my focus for the last couple of years has been on how to best optimize training in the gym and life outside it. The FITFLO system encompasses just that. Ultimately FITFLO is about life optimization. I also realize FITFLO is my perspective on life optimization and that it is based on my own specific values and beliefs. Not everyone has the same set of values and beliefs and there is nothing wrong with that. You can still benefit from training at Alliance even if your values and beliefs differ. Simply take any aspects of our training and utilize them where they fit in with your specific goals.

First, I want to give you a clearer view of where my idea of optimization comes from and what it means to me. From that, my hope is that you may see how it fits for you.  As far back as I can remember it was engrained in me that I should do my best. Honestly, I don’t specifically remember where this idea originated from, but my parents certainly played a role in instilling this concept. What I do recall is sitting in church at an early age and hearing the parable of talents. In this story where a wealthy master gave his servants a certain number of talents before leaving to go away for a period of time.  One servant receives five, another two, and one servant received one. When the master returned he was please with the two servants that had taken the talents and invested them to create more while one simply buried his to avoid losing it. He rewarded the servants who had invested while he took away the talent from the one who simply buried his and did nothing with it. I remember being young enough to not really understand but thinking that it was okay to bury it for fear of losing it. I would say this was my first true memory of optimization. My belief became that we were meant to go out and develop what talents God has given us. Of course, along the way there have been many coaches and teachers that emphasized this same idea of applying work ethic in order to become your best. There is also the Theory of Human Motivation from psychologist, Abraham Maslow, known as the “Hierarchy of Needs”. There are eight levels of development where each level must be satisfied before moving to the next. The two top levels have to do with self optimization. The seventh level is self actualization and the eighth is transcendence, where after self actualizing you have the need to help others self actualize.  We also have the word from Greek philosophy, “Arete”. This is a word I have mentioned previously which means being your best self from moment to moment. I learned about this from Brian Johnson of Optimize.me. I have become a big fan of Brian and follow his  Optimize.me  website daily. These are just some of the origins from which I have developed my belief of the importance of optimization.

What I or anyone else considers to be optimization will be based on what they value. Let me use a few examples to illustrate this point. When we first started our Jiujitsu program I made the assumption that everyone had the same goals for training as I did and I quickly learned that was not the case. Therefore I decided to create a handout questioning what the students goals were. I remember one particular response which, at the time, baffled me. One student’s response was that “he did not have any goals in particular and that he was pretty happy with where he was.” Another example comes from Tony Robbins. At one of his trainings he quizzed two people about there goals and what it took to make them happy. The first, was a man who most would have considered to be very successful. He had a successful business and was a millionaire, he was healthy, and had a great family. When asked  what it took to make him happy his answer was that he had to make more money, get his body fat from 15% down to 12% etc. The second guy was known at the workshop as the guy with the most energy and when asked what it took to make him happy his answer was simply, “Every day above ground is a good day.” Part of me wants to say that the guy with no goals and the guy who looks at everyday as a good day need to be more motivated to improve themselves but who am I to say. If they are actually happy and are productive members of society then more power to them.The guy who had very defined goals and by most peoples standards was super successful was unhappy. Maybe happiness is as Mo Gawdat puts it in his book ,”Solve for Happy”,  simply a combination of your expectations and perceptions. What I consider to be an optimized life is one where we are happy, healthy, and strong. What I am looking for is to help those with similar values and beliefs optimize.

So what is the FITFLO approach to becoming happy, healthy, and strong? To reiterate, happy is an individual thing but to me revolves around finding a balance of mind, body, spirit , and connection.  So optimization revolves around those things. To optimize we need to focus on the following five critical areas:
1. Mental
2. Physical
3. Nutrition
4. Spiritual

These are many of the same areas that human potential coaches such as Mark Divine, Dave Asprey, and Ben Greenfield emphasize in their programs. We have been providing group challenges in each of these areas this year in order to help you optimize and we will continue to do so. What we are doing next is providing a more individualized approach to this process where we create specific action steps and hold you accountable to their execution. Last year we began working on this more individualized approach but it was more related to the physical area and movement. We are now ready to help you take it to the next level as we move towards Arete and an optimized life.

More details on this program to come this month.